Blog #16: Response to Warrior Tradition- It’s not just about swords and Heeeeya’s

December 4, 2008

The following questions are from Mr. Jones’s Blog

1.  What are some elements of the “warrior tradition”?

I think some elements include things such as the ability to use “supernatural” powers such as climbing up the wall or flying from roof to roof.

 

Walking on water gives the warrior some feeling of awe and godliness. 

Walking on water gives the warrior some feeling of awe and godliness.

Using some supernatural power gives sense of awe and admiration towards the warrior who have been depicted with these feelings over decades. These feelings helps to idolize warriors and adds a sense of godliness to warriors. As a part of warrior tradition, warriors need to be idolized so people could appreciate what they do to ordinary people. Warriors had to live through hard work and painful training; it was no easy process. Afterwards, warriors were obliged to perform tasks that no one else could do: protect the people from evil forces. Thus, I think the effort and  time warriors put in would be paid off if many people would admire and even worship the what the warrior did.

Another element of “warrior tradition” would be the posture. From time to time, warriors from movies such as Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon and House of Flying Daggers abruptly stopped fighting and positioned themselves in a kung-fu posture.

Posture is important to emphasis formality and recollection of spirit

Posture is important to emphasis formality and recollection of spirit

This could be to recollect one’s spirit or calm their minds to focus better. Also, postures remind the warriors that they are fighting in a more dignified way and not just a street fight. This would remind them about certain rules of kung-fu such as no-killing policy.

 

2. How is the natural world depicted in relation to martial arts?

I think natural world is depicted as the source of ultimate power in relation to martial arts. If we look at the powerful sword from Crouching Tigers, Hidden Dragon the name of the sword was “Green Destiny.” This name signifies that nature is the source of power among warriors since the word green easily relates to nature. If one uses nature carefully, then one can win the fight. For example, from House of Flying Daggers the general was able to win the blind dancer by using water.

Use of nature as source of power is not limited to kung-fu. The surrounding nature seems to give more power to the warrior; nature is on his side.

Use of nature as source of power is not limited to kung-fu. The surrounding nature seems to give more power to the warrior; nature is on his side.

 

3. How are gender roles important to the scenes we watched?

Gender roles are important to add tension to the scenes we watched. For example, usually women’s roles in old China are mostly inferior to men’s roles. However, directors could challenge this notion to make the scene more interesting. For example, the House of Flying Dagger was interesting to watch because women  were  as powerful or even more powerful than men.

There is something special about female warriors

There is something special about female warriors

4. What else caught your eye or is worth noting?

I thought the wide variety of weapons in the films were worth noting. I once watched a program from National Geographic Channel about kung-fu weapons. When I watched the program, I thought it was almost impossible to use that many weapons when fighting because I thought a warrior could not even think of using that many weapons. However, when I watched the fighting scene between two sisters from Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon I began to realize it was possible and that it was essential for kung-fu warriors to be able to utilize as many weapons as possible.

More weapons, better?

More weapons, better?

 

source: http://adambenjones.wordpress.com/2008/11/03/blog-16-the-warrior-tradition/

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